Wednesday, 4 January 2017

Peripheral Gangrene Following Snake Bite

📸: Peripheral Gangrene Following Snake Bite (picture on bottom right)
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📚📚The toxic component of snake venom can be classified into four broad categories: enzymes, polypeptides, glycoproteins, and compounds of low molecular weight.
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📚🏨The current guidelines for first aid include the following:
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👉🏽Reassure the victim (70% of all snakebites are by nonvenomous snakes and 50% of bites by venomous species are dry bites.
👉🏽Immobilize the affected limb (by bandage or clothes to hold splint, but tight arterial compression is not recommended)
👉🏽Prompt transfer of the victim to the hospital.
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Management of a snakebite 🏨includes reviewing the ABCs and evaluating the patient for signs of shock.
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👉🏽A: Start with a rapid assessment of the patient's airway.
👉🏽B: Administer oxygen therapy. Keep a close watch on the airway at all times in case intubation becomes necessary.
👉🏽C: Monitor🕵🏾 vital signs and establish at least one large-bore IV and initiate crystalloid infusion.
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✅Restrict activity and immobilize the affected area; keep walking to a minimum.
✅Remove any jewelry or constricting clothing from the patient's affected area.
❌Do not manipulate the wound site. It is not recommended to incise the site or perform oral suction.
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👉🏽Give Antivenin💉💉.
👉🏽Investigations: FBC, Clotting studies and fibrinogen level.
👉🏽Monitor🕵🏾 patient for the development of compartment syndrome.
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Credit: @medicina_chirurgia
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